David Yuan

David Yuan

Partner, NBBJ
David leads NBBJ’s commercial architecture practice in the Pacific Northwest. With an interest in land use policy, he currently serves as Vice Chair of the Downtown Seattle Association’s Smart Growth Committee and on the Advisory Board of the Runstad Center for Real Estate at the University of Washington. He was also on the Board of the Downtown Seattle Association and is a former Chair of the Pioneer Square Preservation Board.

When Everyone Shops Online, What Happens to Mixed-Use Retail?

How Changing Retail Trends Are Creating New Opportunities for Urban Experiences and Public Space

December 20, 2016

Partner, NBBJ

As more and more people desire an urban lifestyle, architects and developers are creating a large number of mixed-use projects — that is, developments and even single buildings that combine residential and commercial uses with retail and public space. A recent PricewaterhouseCoopers survey ranked mixed-use developments the highest-rated real estate niche for 2017 [PDF]. This paradigm is not new. What is new: everyone is wrestling with what to do with the ground floor, because retail is changing a lot.

In Seattle, the land use code either mandates retail at street level or exempts retail from counting against chargeable floor area. So developers and architects include it, either because they have to or because it is incentivized. But this part of the code was written a long time ago; retail then was different than it is today.

Many developers are now unsure what to do with retail at the ground floor, because most people now don’t go there to buy “stuff”: if you want something, you buy it on Amazon and have it delivered. But retail is such an important aspect of the street space and pedestrian experience. If retail at the street level is empty — and I see a lot of empty storefronts now in Seattle — it sends a bad message about the development, even when all the office space on the upper floors is full.

Restaurants open onto a public passageway at the new Amazon headquarters in Seattle.

Restaurants open onto a public passageway at the new Amazon headquarters in Seattle. (Kevin Scott/NBBJ)

Because we buy things differently, a lot of retail is now shifting to programs that deliver an experience, instead of showcasing objects for sale. Some of these new retail uses in Seattle include things like “doggie daycare,” which creates lively storefront experiences by showcasing the pets belonging to downtown residents who work during the day. And Amazon is now experimenting with “Amazon Go,” a new retail model based on a seamless experience rather than product display, where one can buy items with a smartphone and not have to go through a cashier.

Another common way to expand the experience is by extending the feeling of the space from the inside to the outside. For this reason, many restaurants are installing glass doors that slide out of the way in good weather. At the new Amazon headquarters in downtown Seattle, where all the ground-level uses are food-related, public space is integrated with the dining experience, with tables and chairs under glass canopies. These intimate spaces spill out onto the sidewalks, into a midblock thoroughfare or into a small plaza where the public can gather around a sculpture and eat lunches bought from food trucks.

So the question of open space is no longer just about building big parks like Central Park. Many architects are experimenting with creative ways to use the edges and leftover spaces around buildings to create activated gathering areas for small groups of people. And many developers are realizing that distributing public space in this way can bring added value to their properties. Retail is changing, and this provides new opportunities not just for developers and retailers, but for the city itself.

Image courtesy of Pexels.

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In 2040 Seattle, How Should the City Grow?

We Need to Create a More Affordable, Dense, Inclusive Puget Sound

September 13, 2016

Partner, NBBJ

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published by Seattle Business.

Seattle has an enviable problem. More and more people are moving to the Puget Sound, so many that, by some estimates, the region’s population could increase by one million residents by 2040. At the same time, Seattle is constrained geographically by water and hills. Our topography is scenic and beautiful, but it also makes it difficult to build new housing.

Further complicating matters, approximately 65 percent of Seattle’s land area is zoned for single-family residences. The hourglass shape of Seattle, at its widest point — between Ballard and Magnuson Park, parallel to 65th Street — is zoned for the lowest density [PDF]. Meanwhile, the area zoned for the densest development — downtown — is narrowest and where land is most scarce.

Water, land and zoning regulations: these are the facts. If population trends continue, how will people live in our city? As Seattle densifies, how can design provide a more humane environment and housing that all residents can afford? These are some of the questions I’m interested to explore at an NBBJ salon event in October, “Seattle 2040: Where Will All the People Live?”

As an architect, I’m particularly interested in how we might insert greater density, for people of all incomes, into our existing street network including the single-family areas that constitute such a high proportion of Seattle. Mother-in-law apartments, residential units over garages, duplexes and townhouses are just a few options. Done right, we could increase density and affordability without dramatically changing the character of those neighborhoods.

This November a major ballot initiative, Sound Transit 3, could raise billions of dollars to expand light rail. If that happens, it would substantially increase the number of transit-oriented centers in our region, which would lessen the impact of building because we could spread it across more light rail stations.

There are other options. We could look at reusing and densifying public rights-of-way. High-rises like the “no-shadow tower” could mitigate the impacts of tall building on the urban environment. Or driverless cars might create a new transportation system in the next 25 years that fundamentally changes how we get around and where to encourage development.

If you think about the design of office space, 25 years ago, a majority had a private office with limited public amenities; now office space is moving in the other direction, asking people to have less personal space at their desk, but having access to a wider range of shared amenities. I almost think we need a similar approach whereby people move from large single-family houses to smaller homes or apartments. The key to making this work is to have access to more shared, semi-private amenities or nearby public open space.

Some of the issues Seattle faces also challenge many other U.S. cities, but these challenges cannot be solved by design firms single-handedly. A city’s growth affects everyone, young and old, rich and poor, newcomers and long-time residents. We are in this together, and it will require everyone to bring about our shared future.

Banner image courtesy of Harold Hollingsworth/Flickr.

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