What’s the Value of City Master Planning?

A Conversation about the Imagine Boston 2030 Master Plan — and the Top Issues Facing Cities Today

November 7, 2017

Architect / Urban Designer, NBBJ

Amidst a thriving economy and growing population, the City of Boston released its much-anticipated “Imagine Boston 2030” plan. Now that a broad range of perspectives and recommendations have emerged from the plan’s extensive public engagement, a discussion about the specific priorities identified, and how to marshal these to action, has begun — a discussion that mirrors those taking place in cities across the country.

On October 25, 2017, NBBJ hosted an informative debate about Imagine Boston 2030, along with:

Following are excerpts from that discussion. From healthcare and academia to commercial development and government, these experts highlighted the merits of the master plan — as well as the work that remains for us all.

 

NBBJ_Boston Salon-0041What is the value of Imagine Boston 2030 — or any master plan?

Dante Ramos:
“When we think of a master plan for a city, we sometimes think of zoning maps that say ‘this area will be 100 feet tall, and these uses will be allowed in this area.’ That’s not really what Imagine Boston 2030 is. This plan expresses more of an attitude toward growth, rather than decreeing precisely where it’s going to go. It describes a certain urban core and gradual improvements in quality of life, as well as enhancements in density and a move towards mixed uses.”

Joel Sklar:
“From our perspective, the master planning priorities outlined in documents like the 2030 plan are about what kind of neighborhood, what kind of vision do we collectively want to build together. Then we focus on the nuts and bolts of master planning: what should the streets look like, what should the sidewalks look like, what’s the mix of uses and what’s the density? From our perspective, those master plans have to take place at the local, community level. I think a broader visioning document like the 2030 plan is an appropriate context within which to really dig in at the neighborhood level to envision what happens.”

Valerie Roberson:
“To me, the value of a plan is the opportunity for people to discuss the data and what the data means. For Roxbury, it was a way to tap into industries outside of education. It allows us to respond in a way that’s appropriate for the students and the community that surrounds us — it certainly helps us to organize our plan within the larger plan for the city.”

 

NBBJ_Boston Salon-0023How has technology changed the way cities work?

Valerie Roberson:
“At Roxbury, partly because of the solar canopies we built, people started talking to us about smart building technology. We did the research, and there are not a lot of programs across the United States that talk about who’s going to run these smart buildings. We’ve made them high-energy-efficiency, but we are not training people to run them and not realizing the savings. So we’re building this program for the people who are going to run our smart buildings, to give them an opportunity to really contribute to the economy.”

Joel Sklar:
“One of the most impactful technology-related trends, not just in Boston but around the world, is Uber. It’s filling gaps in urban transit systems like Boston’s. We’ve gone from having to provide about 70 percent of our residential units with parking spaces to now somewhere around 30 percent. We were building large shopping destinations like Target woven into the fabric of the city, and we had to provide significant amounts of parking that are just not being used.”

Alex Krieger:
“I agree, although in the interim period there will be more congestion rather than less. Our cars, Uber cars and driverless vehicles will all be competing for space. Every transportation enhancement in history has made people want to move more and take more trips. The other half that will become important over time is ‘stuff coming to us,’ rather than ‘us going after stuff’ — whether jobs or meals or so forth. Hopefully that will lead to an ultimate reduction in the need to travel.”

 

NBBJ_Boston Salon-0075If technology is transforming mobility, what role will transit play in the future?

Tom Glynn:
“More people access Logan Airport via high-occupancy vehicles than at any other airport in the country, about 40 percent, mainly because of the Blue Line and the Silver Line. So we are very dependent on a successful transit system, both for our employees and our passengers. 17,000 people work at the airport, and most are probably coming in on the Blue Line or the Silver Line. And when I worked at Partners Healthcare, 40 percent of Massachusetts General Hospital employees took the Red Line to work. I think we sometimes underestimate how important transit is for the functioning of our major institutions — the airport and MGH being two good examples.”

Valerie Roberson:
“I’m from Chicago, and this is just my opinion, but a lot of the problems in Chicago are directly because of the lack of economic mobility caused by people not having equal access to transportation. Without that access, they have to create their own economies, and that erupts into all kinds of social ills. So I don’t think there’s too much emphasis you can put on a plan to make sure that cities ensure access to all populations. That’s an integral part of what we have to do as a city, to keep each other safe and to keep opportunity there for all citizens.”

Tom Glynn:
“When I was at the T, from 1989 to 1991, I had half the number of passengers and a thousand more employees. I think they’re doing a good job with the situation in which they find themselves, because we keep expanding the system, but the revenue base hasn’t kept pace with the expansion. I’m optimistic, but I think they have a lot of catching up to do.”

 

NBBJ_Boston Salon-0070What are the challenges to building affordable housing?

Joel Sklar:
“There’s been a pronounced and steady decline in resources available for the creation of affordable housing. An incredible amount of funding comes from the federal government, whether in the form of community block grants, low-income housing tax credits, Section 8, or HUD programs. They all trickle through the states and down to nonprofits and public housing authorities. Today there’s a goal of creating 53,000 housing units to keep up with demand in this market, but resources aren’t coming from the federal government. So there’s been a focus on harnessing the internal subsidy of a for-profit, market-rate apartment building, to build 13 or 15 percent of the units as affordable, but all the juice has been wrung out of those private deals throughout the last 10 or 15 years.”

 

NBBJ_Boston Salon-0097How can cities finance what they need?

Alex Krieger:
“If there’s no funding available from the feds, some other model has to emerge. There must be some way to gather resources from prominent institutions and developers for a broader goal, beyond the immediate benefit they provide on their own property.”

Joel Sklar:
“I would say, why are you asking developers and local institutions to finance it? Over the last ten years, the cost to build a high-rise apartment building has increased 60 to 70 percent, and the returns correspondingly have decreased dramatically. Already, projects are not going forward. We’re at such an inflection point that I don’t see that being a viable way to finance infrastructure. We won’t even say the word anymore, but why not think about taxation? Everybody benefits from overall infrastructure, beyond real estate developers and property owners.”

Alex Krieger:
“As a taxpayer, if I don’t see the major investors, developers, institutions — public and private — doing what they can towards a larger goal, then I’m going to resist my taxes going up. Maybe, just for image reasons, a coalition could make an initial contribution in hope to change the tax laws, or inspire venture capital, or whatever. There’s a sense from the population at large that we have to bear the cost, but others, that seem able to bear more, never rise to the level of the broad public good.”

 

NBBJ_Boston Salon-0948Is the future regional?

Alex Krieger:
“Some form of regional planning needs to emerge, because many of the issues that we complain about are not going to be solved within the municipal boundaries. Boston led the way to regional planning, when a bunch of Brahmins in the 1890s bought a bunch of land and became the Trustees’ Reservation, which eventually became the MDC, which controlled the parkways and waterways. So there are moments in American history when regionalism seemed to rise, but not enough of it is happening. More of it should. How? I don’t know.”

Joel Sklar:
“The notion that housing needs to be resolved in core neighborhoods is difficult. The cost to build a high-rise in Boston is $650 to $700 or more per square foot. A little further out, but still in Boston, a low-rise podium with stick-built housing is maybe $450 to $500 per square foot. Take that same project and move it to Somerville, or further along the rail corridors, and it’s $350 dollars per square foot. So there are inherent options in regionalization that we can’t, no matter how well we plan, address just within the core of Boston. Transit is obviously another issue that can’t be solved without a regional approach. Regional planning is critical.”

 

Banner image courtesy of PixabayAll other images courtesy of NBBJ.

Share this:  envelope facebook twitter googleplus tumblr linkedin
Comment Follow nbbX

Learning from Tech Workplaces

How Research Labs Are Changing to Accommodate New Computational Paradigms

November 2, 2017

Principal / Architect, NBBJ

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published by Laboratory Design.

Workplaces around the world are evolving as organizations like Apple, Google and Amazon seek to design offices that increase collaboration, integrate new technologies and help employees work more efficiently. This ethos is now making its way to the buildings where scientists and researchers work. Here’s why:

 

Research is going digital…

The methods scientists use to conduct research are changing. Labs are traditionally divided into three segments: clinical work, “wet” lab spaces (lab experiments using liquids) and “dry” lab spaces (labs using computers). Analysis and discoveries are becoming increasingly computation-based, or dry, compared to traditional wet laboratories.

From 2013 to 2015, the National Institutes of Health’s dry research funding for networking and IT R&D increased 40%, growing from $521 million to $729 million. The past decade has seen an explosion in data-intensive life sciences, including genomic research and medicine centering on healthcare customization and treatments based on patient DNA sequences.

The focus on data and computing in science fields is creating a shift in roles. There are close to twice as many dry bench scientists — including computation, informatics/clinical outcomes and clinical scientists — than wet bench scientists working today. Dry labs also require about 20% less space, at a little under 100 square feet per person versus close to 125 square feet per person in a wet lab.

Data creation, metadata (data about data) management and data curation are increasingly becoming the domain of the scientist. Lab benches are drying out.

 

Innovations require collaboration.

Social network modeling and studies show that collaboration, not just within teams but between teams, is crucial to increased productivity, idea generation and effective communication. The denser and less siloed the social network, the more creative the lab. New or repurposed science workspaces have a responsibility to accommodate these findings.

100909_00_b_w_btm_n42_large

The Building for Translational Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (photo courtesy Sean Airhart/NBBJ)

Translational research and medicine, a biomedical field that blends research, clinical work and community health efforts, is becoming the norm. Carrying research from theory to implementation is now happening all in the same space. Research is becoming increasingly cross-disciplinary and interdependent.

From a design perspective, distance matters. Visual transparency between wet and dry labs is critical to supporting interdisciplinary and serendipitous connections by helping increase social ties. Organizations like Brigham and Women’s Hospital are bringing benchside (medical research), bedside (clinics) and imaging facilities together under one roof.

The recently opened Allen Institute in Seattle intersperses collaborative meeting spaces, neuroscience and biomedical research zones and labs into one building to investigate how our brains and cells function.

 

How can research organizations design for data?

Tech companies focus on maximizing human performance in their offices. These businesses typically emphasize key factors to attract data scientists: company mission, amenities, brand expression, an activity-based workplace and mobility.

050229_01_n13

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA (photo courtesy NBBJ)

Here are a few design takeaways from the tech field that could be applied to science workspaces:

  • Provide creativity-boosting open collaborative and more sheltered huddle spaces for work, as well as in-between spaces like a café, lounge or even just an area to refresh and recharge. A balance between prospect and refuge areas is critical. A classic example, the Louis Kahn-designed Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, weaves in these principles through the open courtyard to the more enclosed offices.
  • Numerous studies have documented the stress-reduction effects of nature. So bring in some green — simulated or real — and orient work spaces toward views.
  • Building in ways to get exercise at work improves cognitive levels. Providing exercise-oriented amenities or access to outdoors and places to move — such as stairs and areas for stretching and other light activities — can help.
  • Bring in visual interest. A beautiful environment is proven to increase blood flow in parts of the brain that center on emotion and reward, which can help increase engagement and motivation.

 

Design for interdisciplinary work.

Designing better spaces is about understanding, optimizing and anticipating spatial needs. It’s about reallocating available space — learning how space is being used and which space is underused. For new projects, it’s about identifying core challenges and designing appropriate solutions. But more importantly, it’s about people.

Banner photo courtesy Lara Swimmer/NBBJ.

Share this:  envelope facebook twitter googleplus tumblr linkedin
Comment Follow nbbX

How Can Healthcare Institutions Become Disaster-Ready?

A Conversation About Healthcare Resiliency and Design in Seattle

September 6, 2017

Healthcare Partner, NBBJ

The Pacific Northwest is a beautiful place to live and work. But with that beauty comes the potential for natural disasters — everything from earthquakes to volcanic eruptions. Combined with the uncertainty associated with climate change, how should local healthcare systems address these issues to protect their patients, safeguard their assets and conserve resources?

We decided to convene a “Disaster Ready” series of panel discussions, design workshops, articles and papers to address this important topic of resiliency. This summer in Seattle, Puget Sound Business Journal healthcare reporter Coral Garnick moderated a lively discussion on the importance of resilient healthcare facilities.

The panelists — John Hooper (Magnusson Klemencic Associates), Christine Kiefer (Harborview Medical Center), Onora Lien (Northwest Healthcare Response Network) and Mackenzie Skene (NBBJ) — shared their expertise, including resiliency best practices from healthcare projects located in areas vulnerable to natural disasters.

The following is an edited recording of that discussion. From designing “upside-down hospitals” that protect against rising sea levels, to advocating for policies that require more from critical care facilities, learn what healthcare systems can do locally and beyond to withstand the unknowns of a changing environment.

 

 

Here are a few highlights from the conversation:

The definition of resiliency
“I’ve also had the chance to work in New Orleans, following up on Katrina and replacing the hospital damaged by Katrina, and it changed my whole view of resiliency at that point, because it was less about buildings, and it was more about the people, and the operations, and the continuity of the mission.”
—Mackenzie Skene

The importance of practice — and community
“The drilling, the practice, the scenarios and learning the communication… I can’t say enough: it shouldn’t just be us practicing in isolation, but the system practicing together.”
—Christine Kiefer

Who’s responsible
“I worry a lot that the work of preparedness often lives with one champion within an organization, one emergency manager or part-time facility person who’s tasked to do a lot of this. While I recognize there’s a lot of competing demands, in order for us to really move the needle, there has to be a more inclusive strategy within the organizations, and the accountability and the responsibility needs to live much broader than just an emergency manager.”
—Onora Lien

What we can fix, today
“There’s one or two [older buildings] on a campus … that the infrastructure may go through, the medical gasses, the power, the water, et cetera. That’s what I worry about. It’s that small percentage that, if you fix that one or two buildings, you’ve improved your resiliency by a factor of two or three. If you’re going to pick a low-hanging fruit, do those.”
—John Hooper

 

Image courtesy of Wikimedia.

Share this:  envelope facebook twitter googleplus tumblr linkedin
Comment Follow nbbX
Next Page »