How Can Healthcare Institutions Become Disaster-Ready?

A Conversation About Healthcare Resiliency and Design in Seattle

September 6, 2017

Healthcare Partner, NBBJ

The Pacific Northwest is a beautiful place to live and work. But with that beauty comes the potential for natural disasters — everything from earthquakes to volcanic eruptions. Combined with the uncertainty associated with climate change, how should local healthcare systems address these issues to protect their patients, safeguard their assets and conserve resources?

We decided to convene a “Disaster Ready” series of panel discussions, design workshops, articles and papers to address this important topic of resiliency. This summer in Seattle, Puget Sound Business Journal healthcare reporter Coral Garnick moderated a lively discussion on the importance of resilient healthcare facilities.

The panelists — John Hooper (Magnusson Klemencic Associates), Christine Kiefer (Harborview Medical Center), Onora Lien (Northwest Healthcare Response Network) and Mackenzie Skene (NBBJ) — shared their expertise, including resiliency best practices from healthcare projects located in areas vulnerable to natural disasters.

The following is an edited recording of that discussion. From designing “upside-down hospitals” that protect against rising sea levels, to advocating for policies that require more from critical care facilities, learn what healthcare systems can do locally and beyond to withstand the unknowns of a changing environment.

 

 

Here are a few highlights from the conversation:

The definition of resiliency
“I’ve also had the chance to work in New Orleans, following up on Katrina and replacing the hospital damaged by Katrina, and it changed my whole view of resiliency at that point, because it was less about buildings, and it was more about the people, and the operations, and the continuity of the mission.”
—Mackenzie Skene

The importance of practice — and community
“The drilling, the practice, the scenarios and learning the communication… I can’t say enough: it shouldn’t just be us practicing in isolation, but the system practicing together.”
—Christine Kiefer

Who’s responsible
“I worry a lot that the work of preparedness often lives with one champion within an organization, one emergency manager or part-time facility person who’s tasked to do a lot of this. While I recognize there’s a lot of competing demands, in order for us to really move the needle, there has to be a more inclusive strategy within the organizations, and the accountability and the responsibility needs to live much broader than just an emergency manager.”
—Onora Lien

What we can fix, today
“There’s one or two [older buildings] on a campus … that the infrastructure may go through, the medical gasses, the power, the water, et cetera. That’s what I worry about. It’s that small percentage that, if you fix that one or two buildings, you’ve improved your resiliency by a factor of two or three. If you’re going to pick a low-hanging fruit, do those.”
—John Hooper

 

Image courtesy of Wikimedia.

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